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    Dale’s Books

    Dale Best

    • Gems for the Day (Daily Devotions)
      Gems for the Day (Daily Devotions)
      by Dale Best
    • Living the Bible: Stepping through the Gospels (Volume 4)
      Living the Bible: Stepping through the Gospels (Volume 4)
      by Dale Best
    • Every Day With A King: Daily Devotions With King David
      Every Day With A King: Daily Devotions With King David
      by Dale Best
    • Easy Lessons for Successful Living (Volume 3)
      Easy Lessons for Successful Living (Volume 3)
      by Dale Best
    • Every Day with a King (Christian Devotions)
      Every Day with a King (Christian Devotions)
      by Dale Best
    • Living with the Bible: Stepping through the Gospels
      Living with the Bible: Stepping through the Gospels
      by Dale Best
    • Easy Lessons for Successful Living
      Easy Lessons for Successful Living
      by Dale E. Best

    Positive Principles For Executives by Dale Best

    Dale’s Résumé

    • Native of Worden, IL
    • Twenty years of public school teaching
    • BA, McKendree University, Lebanon IL
    • MS ED, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale IL
    • M DIV, Christian Theological Seminary, Indianapolis IN
    • Elder, Illinois Great River Annual Conference, United Methodist Church
    • Ordained in 1985
    • Retired after twenty years active ministry

    Index

    Entries in regret (2)

    12:00AM

    Recheck Our Life’s Goals

    Bronnie Ware, who worked for years nursing the dying, capsulized the following. Her first and loudest advice is: Life is a choice. It is OUR life. Choose consciously, choose wisely, choose honestly to choose happiness. It is easy to see how many dreams had gone unfulfilled due to choices they had made, or not made.

    Each person, as they were staring at the end of their life, experienced a variety of these emotions: denial, fear, anger, remorse, more denial, and eventually acceptance.

    When questioned about any regrets they had, the most common regret of all was, “I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself.”

    All of the men she nursed most deeply regretted spending so much of their lives working so hard. Working women of this generation also agreed. They missed their children’s youth and their partner’s companionship. Another states, “I wish I’d had the courage to express my feelings of love and forgiveness.”
    Too late, they realized that bitterness and resentment resided deep in their heart.

    “I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends.” They had let golden friendships slip away. Often they did not truly realize the full benefits of old friends until their dying weeks. There were many deep regrets about not giving friendships the time and effort that they deserved. Everyone misses their friends when they are dying. All that remains in the final weeks the realization of the need of love and relationships, not finances. On our deathbed, what others think of us is the farthest thing our mind.

    I wish that I had let myself be happier. This is a surprisingly common one. Many did not realize until the end that happiness is a choice. Deep within they longed to laugh and have silliness in their life again. How wonderful to be able to let go and smile again, long before we are dying.