Search
Send Email
This form does not yet contain any fields.
    Dale’s Books

    Dale Best

    • Gems for the Day (Daily Devotions)
      Gems for the Day (Daily Devotions)
      by Dale Best
    • Living the Bible: Stepping through the Gospels (Volume 4)
      Living the Bible: Stepping through the Gospels (Volume 4)
      by Dale Best
    • Every Day With A King: Daily Devotions With King David
      Every Day With A King: Daily Devotions With King David
      by Dale Best
    • Easy Lessons for Successful Living (Volume 3)
      Easy Lessons for Successful Living (Volume 3)
      by Dale Best
    • Every Day with a King (Christian Devotions)
      Every Day with a King (Christian Devotions)
      by Dale Best
    • Living with the Bible: Stepping through the Gospels
      Living with the Bible: Stepping through the Gospels
      by Dale Best
    • Easy Lessons for Successful Living
      Easy Lessons for Successful Living
      by Dale E. Best

    Positive Principles For Executives by Dale Best

    Dale’s Résumé

    • Native of Worden, IL
    • Twenty years of public school teaching
    • BA, McKendree University, Lebanon IL
    • MS ED, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale IL
    • M DIV, Christian Theological Seminary, Indianapolis IN
    • Elder, Illinois Great River Annual Conference, United Methodist Church
    • Ordained in 1985
    • Retired after twenty years active ministry

    Index

    Entries in arguing (1)

    6:50AM

    Arguing

    There is an underlying reason why arguments start. Undisclosed secrets, half-truths, and incomplete information are the seeds from which argument germinates. Winning a spat makes us feel superior. On the negative side, losing an argument makes us lose face in front of our workers. Some disagreements originate from blaming another worker. Automatically, they defend their stance. Successful people choose their battles. Some reasons are based on principle. When it is inconsequential, feel free to back off and let the other person appear to win.

    All arguments are negative and need to be avoided. Arguing digs a deeper hole instead of leveling the field or coming to any agreement. Dale Carnegie states that nine times out of ten arguments end with each person becoming more convinced than ever that their point of view is absolutely right. Another person of history after years of observation agreed with Mr. Carnegie. For the last fifty years of his life the great diplomat Benjamin Franklin forbid himself to abruptly contradict anyone or personally engage in an argument.